Book Review: Just Do Something

Just Do Something

 

There are books you read and like.  There are books you read and can recommend portions of that book to others.  Then there are books you read and think, “This should be required reading for anyone under the age of twenty five.”  Kevin DeYoung’s book “Just do Something” is a book that I wish I had my senior year of high school as I took “calling tests” and obsessed about what in the world I was supposed to do once I graduated.  I wish I had this book in my early twenties as I wrestled with false condemnation because I didn’t have a “vision for my calling” vocationally.  This book could have saved me from a lot of sleepless nights and useless anxiety.

So let me not only recommend but exhort you to buy and read this book.  But first let me suggest that you position your heart first.  A good thing to ask yourself before reading “Just do something” is, “Where did my notion of ‘God’s will’ come from anyway?”  That’s a question I was struck with as I read this book.  From my recollection I don’t ever remember someone ever preaching to me that there was this ideal roadmap of life God wanted me to be on, but He either unintentionally or cruelly forgot to give it to me.  It was just presumed that God had an “ideal” job, place to live, person to marry for me.  Kevin DeYoung actually spends the first half of the book dispelling what I normally thought of as “God’s will”.  Josh Harris in the forward described the book as occasionally smacking you upside the head,” …but you’ll be better for the smack.”  I want to prepare you for the “smack”.  If you’re older you’ll think to yourself, “I’ve done that!  I’ve even said that!”  If you’re younger you’ll be tempted to dismiss because maybe you’ve never heard God’s will explained in such a straightforward, challenging way.  You’ll think, “There’s got to be more mystery to it.”  But using scripture, humor, experience and pastoral wisdom, Kevin DeYoung takes a lot of the mystery out of God’s will and making decisions.  He also instructs as to what pursuing what God’s will really looks like, all the while firmly challenging the reader to stop using God as an excuse for laziness and irresponsibility.

Whatever your age, no matter the decisions that face you either big or small, you should read this book.  Just Do Something won’t make the decision for you but will help you see a big God, and how that sovereign God really means for you to glorify Him.  That clarity will give you a sense of peace and purpose in your decision to do something secure in God’s grace and living for His glory.

 

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7 Responses to “Book Review: Just Do Something”

  1. Jay, you should submit this as a book review for the SGTimes…

  2. jaymallow Says:

    Already have. And I’ve encouraged Ron and Aaron that this book should be the focus of the Singles/teen ministry in June. I’ll bet money that since Kevin is speaking at Next (presumably on the topic of His book) that His speech will be the “Next 09” speech.

  3. He’s doing a breakout session for the guys-only on this topic. His main session topic is on Christ’s Life.

  4. jaymallow Says:

    Sigh… “a little levin works itself through the whole dough” This culture of “Adulthood= Marriage” might yet take some work. (but Kevin’s book will definitely help) Why the (insert unprintable explative) is His breakout session GUY ONLY! What girls are just supposed to demurely obey their father’s till marriage? Hoping Mr. Darcy, or Mr. Knightly happens to come along to provide direction? And speaking as a guy name a speach where guy’s weren’t challenged to “step up”. Just once, seriously ONCE I’d like to hear of a message given on a women’s ADULT responsibilities in life and relationships. How come we just presume that girls will know and respond? Or that a woman has an individual call towards God irrespective of another relationship?

  5. Well… you might be jumping to conclusions and reading something into their decision that’s not intended. And I can’t say for certain, but it’s possible Carolyn McCulley has addressed some of your concerns. She’s doing the session for gals:
    (from thisisnext.org)
    Breakout Sessions

    This year we’ll also host breakout sessions in addition to the main sessions for men, women, and men considering ministry.

    * Men – Just Do SomethingKevin DeYoung Being a man, making decisions, and a liberating perspective on finding God’s will.
    * Women – Radical WomanhoodCarolyn McCulleyLiving out feminine faith in a feminist world.
    * Entrust: The Transfer of the Gospel Dave Harvey & Jared MellingerTwo pastors, two generations, partnering in the local church. The story of how one congregation set the stage for the next generation.

  6. jaymallow Says:

    Well in one sense I take back what I just said. Carolyn is a fighter in this debate and from what I’ve read she’s seen what I and Kevin have seen. I’m still a little miffed that Kevin’s doing a guy only break out session. Maybe it’s because I’m from an older generation and at this point I’m tired of getting beat over the head with terms like “laziness” and “cowardliness” when I haven’t been. And hearing over and over(from parents), “she’s young…” as an acceptable excuse for relational interaction doesn’t help. Maybe I still have to resist the urge to pull the sword on this Gordian knot.

  7. Jason Perez Says:

    hi jay,
    liz told me about your blog so i thought i’d stop by. thanks for the review…i read the first chapter of this book online, and i’m excited to read the rest. although i do confess, i was hoping that at some point in my life, i’d experience the “liver shivers.” o well.

    jason

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